Friday, 31 May 2013

Top 5: Gedichten

Vorige week had ik een top 5 en het leek me wel leuk om voortaan elke vrijdag een top 5 van iets te bloggen.

Deze week: Gedichten.

Ik hou van gedichten. Vooral van Engelstalige gedichten. Mijn favorieten zijn de schilder en dichter:
Dante Gabriel Rossetti en zijn zus Christina. Maar ook vele anderen.
Sinds een paar jaar ben ik zelf gedichten gaan schrijven en je kunt er zo lekker je gevoel in kwijt.
Hieronder een aantal van mijn favorieten:

© KH


Sudden Light

By Dante Gabriel Rossetti
I have been here before,
                But when or how I cannot tell:
         I know the grass beyond the door,
                The sweet keen smell,
The sighing sound, the lights around the shore.

         You have been mine before,—
                How long ago I may not know:
         But just when at that swallow's soar
                Your neck turn'd so,
Some veil did fall,—I knew it all of yore.

         Has this been thus before?
                And shall not thus time's eddying flight
         Still with our lives our love restore
                In death's despite,
And day and night yield one delight once more? 



By Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Laugh, and the world laughs with you;
    Weep, and you weep alone;
For the sad old earth must borrow its mirth,
    But has trouble enough of its own.
Sing, and the hills will answer;
    Sigh, it is lost on the air;
The echoes bound to a joyful sound,
    But shrink from voicing care.

Rejoice, and men will seek you;
    Grieve, and they turn and go;
They want full measure of all your pleasure,
    But they do not need your woe.
Be glad, and your friends are many;
    Be sad, and you lose them all,—
There are none to decline your nectared wine,
    But alone you must drink life’s gall.

Feast, and your halls are crowded;
    Fast, and the world goes by.
Succeed and give, and it helps you live,
    But no man can help you die.
There is room in the halls of pleasure
    For a large and lordly train,
But one by one we must all file on
    Through the narrow aisles of pain.

Dream Land

By Christina Rossetti

Where sunless rivers weep
Their waves into the deep,
She sleeps a charmed sleep:
         Awake her not.
Led by a single star,
She came from very far
To seek where shadows are
         Her pleasant lot.

She left the rosy morn,
She left the fields of corn,
For twilight cold and lorn
         And water springs.
Through sleep, as through a veil,
She sees the sky look pale,
And hears the nightingale
         That sadly sings.

Rest, rest, a perfect rest
Shed over brow and breast;
Her face is toward the west,
         The purple land.
She cannot see the grain
Ripening on hill and plain;
She cannot feel the rain
         Upon her hand.

Rest, rest, for evermore
Upon a mossy shore;
Rest, rest at the heart's core
         Till time shall cease:
Sleep that no pain shall wake;
Night that no morn shall break
Till joy shall overtake
         Her perfect peace. 



The Road Not Taken  

By Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.



By Rudyard Kipling

(‘Brother Square-Toes’—Rewards and Fairies)

If you can keep your head when all about you   
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,   
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;   
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
    And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;   
    If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;   
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;   
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,   
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,   
    Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,   
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,   
    And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

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